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Home Personal Development Practicing the Art of Walking Meditation

Practicing the Art of Walking Meditation

The art of walking meditation is not as popular as traditional methods of meditation where you sit down in a form of a cross-legged position. However, walking meditation can prove to be more accessible and easier to renew your inspiration and energy.

 
The Art of Meditation
 
When you engage in walking meditation, you'll be using some of the same principles as regular meditative practice.
 
Here are some tips to use when beginning with meditation:
  • Schedule yourself plenty of time, at least 30 minutes to an hour.
  • Focus all of your attention on your breath.
  • Try to avoid making noise as it may distract you.
  • Concentrate solely on the present moment.
  • Go with the flow.
  • Follow the energy that your mind is giving you.
Introduction To Walking Meditation
 
Walking meditation differs from regular meditation in a few core ways. The most obvious is the fact that you're walking instead of staying still. This is beneficial for those who think more clearly when they're moving around.
 
Also, when you practice walking meditation, you can eventually engage in meditation as you complete day-to-day tasks. This is useful because you won't always have enough time for a standard meditation session.
 
Use these strategies to enhance your experience as you begin walking meditation:
 
1.    Start by standing. Don't begin walking right away. Stay calm and give yourself time to get into a steady pattern of breathing. Once you've achieved this balance, you can begin walking. This stage can take anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes; just do what feels right for you at the time.
 
2.    Choose your location. Have an idea in mind about where you're going to walk before you start the practice. If you don't have a plan in mind beforehand, you may be too distracted thinking about where you're headed.
  • It's up to you where you want to walk, but choose a place that tends to be calm instead of busy. You can walk in a park and take in nature, or you can even walk in circles in a large empty room.
3.    Watch your pace. Your pace will probably vary from session to session, and that's okay. Try starting out faster than intended, then slow down to a pace that makes you feel balanced and almost like your body is doing the work automatically.
 
4.    End your session. Most sessions last about 30 minutes to an hour. This should be enough time for you to enjoy the meditative practice as well as get some exercise in the process. To end your session, slow down and stand up straight for a few minutes. Focus on your breathing just as you did at the beginning of your session.
 
Bringing Meditation Into Everyday Tasks
 
It's a good idea to master the art of walking meditation before trying to bring your regular meditative practice into your everyday living. Doing so will give you a better idea about what it's like to meditate while your body is in motion.
 
While you won't be able to meditate while you're talking or engaging in activities that you're not familiar with, you can start to make it a part of your daily routine, whether it be in the mornings during your commute or during your lunch break.
 
Watch Your Emotions
 
Walking meditation and regular meditation have the power to get you in touch with your true emotions. Some people are unsure about what they're feeling and may end up repressing feelings or acting out in anger. Your emotions will generally rise up during a walking meditation session, which is why it's a good idea for you to engage in these meditation sessions often.
 
With continued practice, you'll find a powerful tool in your life that can calm, refresh, inspire, and motivate you wherever you go!
 
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